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Roger Mayne

Collector Daily

January 13, 2016

Roger Mayne’s photographs of 1950s London are an observant societal study of a city in transition.

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The New Yorker

January 11, 2016

His pictures of children at play and amid rubble-strewn lots and graffiti-covered walls are portraits of resilience

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The Wall Street Journal

December 11, 2015

Roger Mayne (1929-2014) was a major British photographer of the postwar era. 

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Photograph Magazine

December 1, 2015

The London Roger Mayne encountered in the mid-1950s was beat up and bombed out, but as his images prove, still full of life.

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The New Yorker

June 25, 2012

Mayne is wonderfully alert to the skittering dynamics of children at play and their unself-conscious grace while at rest.
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The New Yorker Photo Booth

May 29, 2012

“My approach is visual rather than storytelling—I am a documentary rather than a journalistic photographer,” he said. “I have always had a habit of seeing and looking.”
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The New Yorker

November 12, 2007

One of the greatest living British photographers, Mayne is best known for his pictures of working-class children playing and hanging about on London's gritty Southam Street, made between 1956 and 1961.
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The New York Sun

November 1, 2007

Roger Mayne (born 1929) is one of the few important British photographers of the last half of the 20th century.
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The Village Voice

June 2, 2004

Mayne's genius, like Levitt's, was his ability to freeze spontaneity without sapping its spirit.
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The New Yorker

May 17, 2004

The pictures recall William Klein's and Helen Levitt's American street photography from the same years; Mayne was just as much a master of the decisive moment.
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