News

News: Upcoming Exhibition: PIERRE JAHAN, November 21, 2019

Upcoming Exhibition: PIERRE JAHAN

November 21, 2019

November 21 – January 18

In the mid twentieth-century in France, a time when serious ideologies in art played out against a backdrop of rapid political and social change, Pierre Jahan emerged as a figure uniquely equipped to produce compelling photographs that could often slip seamlessly between the disparate worlds of Surrealism and reportage. He was a successful commercial photographer, whose advertisements, editorial work and book cover images were often aligned with the Surrealist ethos, while his reportage work memorably captured historic events and preserved history.

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Upcoming Art Fair, November  5, 2019

Upcoming Art Fair

November 5, 2019

PARIS PHOTO

VON LINTEL + GITTERMAN

Grand Palais, November 6-10
Booth A32

Featuring:
Christiane Feser •  Klea McKenna • Floris Neusüss • Christopher Russell • Jean-Pierre Sudre

Including:
Laure Albin-Guillot • Constantin Brancusi • Bill Brandt  • Marco Breuer • Josef Breitenbach
Marco Breuer • Chargesheimer • André Kertész • Herbert Matter • Man Ray • Roger Parry
Joahim Schulz • Henry Holmes Smith • Karl Struss • Josef Sudek  

News: Recent Press: Jean-Pierre Sudre in Collector Daily, October 25, 2019 - Loring Knoblauch

Recent Press: Jean-Pierre Sudre in Collector Daily

October 25, 2019 - Loring Knoblauch

In the realm of photographic abstraction, Sudre’s pictures stand out – his mix of processes and experimentation led to works that don’t look like anything else we’ve seen before (or since). Their extremes force us beyond simple admiration of their rhythms and complexities into a grasping search for analogies – their strangeness looks like something else, what exactly we can’t quite say. These are intense photographic expressions, ones whose densely packed mysteries and allusions keep us wondering.

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press: KHALIK ALLAH in PDN, July 19, 2019 - David Walker

Recent Press: KHALIK ALLAH in PDN

July 19, 2019 - David Walker

HOW KHALIK ALLAH BENT THE RULES OF STREET PHOTOGRAPHY, AND FOUND HIS VISION

link to full article


News: Recent Press: ALLEN FRAME in COLLECTOR DAILY, July 10, 2019 - Loring Knoblauch

Recent Press: ALLEN FRAME in COLLECTOR DAILY

July 10, 2019 - Loring Knoblauch

Allen Frame: Suddenly

Two works in Allen Frame’s new show use vernacular photographs that he discovered during a recent year-long residency in Rome as the jumping off point for hybrid wall-filling installations that put the found images into dialogue with his own photographs. The open-ended mysteries of the anonymous vintage photographs offered Frame the opportunity to graft his own interpretations onto the scenes, and he then went on to expand those themes further, twisting past and present into intimately coupled meditations...

The subtle codes of human attraction that inform the two installations are generally absent from Frame’s larger color images. The pictures instead capture pauses – the in-between moments that happen just before and after something else. Ivana looks out of a widow that could be a painting of the Italian countryside, Ugo checks his phone as he walks down the repaired stairs of an older stone balcony, and Pietro sits on the edge of a swimming pool, looking to his right out of the frame. The photographs linger, and that slowness provides space for vicariously stepping into the lull.

In many ways, these pictures are all testing Frame’s ability to find a particular emotional pitch and stay there, allowing it to blossom and expand into something more complex and intricate. In each of these works/projects, he’s trying to capture invisible restlessness, and attempting to freight his understated scenes with a tiny slice of agitation. When he successfully plucks that string, his pictures shimmer with unseen vibrations.

link to full article

Recent Press: ALLEN FRAME in WHAT WILL YOU REMEMBER?

June 20, 2019 - Elin Spring

Fantastic Views

In his three-part exhibit “Suddenly,” Allen Frame’s photographs in Italy build narrative fantasies that draw upon foreign films, theater, southern American literature and his 2018 year-long residency in Rome. Frame starts with and improvises on found Roman photographs from the 1960’s, adding his own scenes with characters who all seem to be anticipating or searching for something. The salon-style grouping “Giuseppe,” a seeming travelogue featuring a strapping sunbather and his friends, the elegantly subdued and ornately framed B&W series “Suddenly” (referencing Tennessee Williams’ 1958 play Suddenly Last Summer) and Frame’s single color photographs of individuals in sun-drenched recreational scenes, all feature a subtle homoerotic charge. With an adroit dichotomy of restrained, often pensive characters in bright, open compositions, Frame’s narratives tease like film stills, building suspense and desire.

link to full article

News: Recent Press: CHRISTIANE FESER in COLLECTOR DAILY, May 14, 2019 - Loring Knoblauch

Recent Press: CHRISTIANE FESER in COLLECTOR DAILY

May 14, 2019 - Loring Knoblauch

Feser has carved out a defensible artistic space for herself by not only smartly leveraging the natural dissonance of the image/object dichotomy of photography but also pushing her works further toward sophisticated investigations of surface and abstraction...

As intricately hand crafted objects, Feser’s prints are undeniably impressive and remarkable, but it’s their resulting ability to make us step back, think, and reassess what we assume is happening that makes them durably intriguing...

Link to full article

News: Interview: ALLEN FRAME, May  2, 2019 - Brainard Carey

Interview: ALLEN FRAME

May 2, 2019 - Brainard Carey

Interview from Praxis Interview Magazine on Yale University Radio WYBCX 

link to podcast

Recent Press: CHRISTIANE FESER in WHAT WILL YOU REMEMBER?

April 10, 2019 - Elin Spring

...If my review is as close as you’re likely to get to New York, then please consider this fair warning that there is no way to do these pieces justice online...Feser’s pieces don’t fool the eye so much as play around with it. The geometric and organic building blocks in her work are pleasingly recognizable – squares, triangles, teardrops – arranged in patterns we initially register as familiar. But soon the encounter veers into a seesaw of puzzlement and revelation. Light frolics with shadows, serendipity defies logic, and materiality flirts with illusion. 

Link to full article

Read More >>
News: ANNOUNCEMENT, April  5, 2019

ANNOUNCEMENT

April 5, 2019


WILLIAM LARSON (1942-2019)  

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of William Larson.

I only met Will in 2014. By then he was already diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. He warned me that there might be times during our conversations when he would be silent and not respond. He didn't want me to worry if I said something wrong and explained, that among other effects of the disease, it sometimes prohibited him from speaking when he wanted to. I share this because Will was very interested in communicating conceptual ideas. His work explores ideas of perception and representation. He was highly aware of many existing dialogues in the history of art and consciously added to them. I know, if I had met him earlier, our conversations would have lasted for hours. I wish I had more time to learn from him. I will miss him deeply.

Our exhibition of his Fireflies series in 2015 remains a highlight in my career. This series were some of the earliest digitally generated works of art. Larson utilized a technology new to the time, a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter, a sophisticated early fax machine, to present a dynamic way of image making that extended the vocabulary of montage. Larson conducted the technology to produce an almost random juxtaposition of dissimilar images. The symbolic, or poetic, potential of the juxtaposition references "the imperfect operations of memory or dreams."

With Fireflies, Larson sought to move beyond the traditional notion of what a photograph can be. He was interested in representing the fluidity of time with a static work of art. He stated: “I started to work and think of photography as a system of production, supporting a bias toward the additive possibilities of the medium, and less the subtractive, descriptive, or literal.”

Larson grew up in western New York and attended the State University of New York at Buffalo. He received his Master’s Degree in 1968 from the Institute of Design, where he studied with Wynn Bullock and Aaron Siskind. Soon after receiving his Master’s degree, he established the photography program at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, where he taught for over 20 years. He was director of graduate photography and digital imaging at Maryland Institute College of Art for 18 years. Larson’s work has been collected and exhibited by numerous institutions around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Carnegie Museum of Art, The Morgan Library and the San Francisco Museum of Art.

—Tom Gitterman

News: Recent Press: ALLEN FRAME in ARTFORUM, February  1, 2019 - Matthew Weinstein

Recent Press: ALLEN FRAME in ARTFORUM

February 1, 2019 - Matthew Weinstein


ALLEN FRAME: INNAMORATO
curated by LIA GANGITANO
PRATT INSTITUTE Oct—Dec 2018

Innamorato,” an exhibition by the writer, filmmaker, and photographer Allen Frame, was dominated by Ennio, 2018, a room-size installation made up of more than fifty found Italian Mussolini-era photographs of an air force pilot, his sister, and a handsome young man. The pictures, hung salon style, were set into a variety of secondhand frames. The subjects of the photos appeared well off, beautiful, and youthful. They could be seen with skis in the mountains and cavorting on beaches, bringing to mind the bourgeois family in Vittorio De Sica’s 1970 film The Garden of the Finzi-Continis.

Seven photographs of Ennio were printed by Frame from negatives he purchased along with the photos. Every portrait is full body, and in each one the man is ready for pleasure, be it in sun or snow. Is he an object of desire for whomever took the pictures? Is it the handsome friend and his sister who yearn for him? Or is it the artist, who rescued these people from the obscurity of a flea market? Or could it be us? Perhaps it’s all of the above. Included in the installation were hand-written passages in Italian taken from Absalom, Absalom! (1936), William Faulkner’s tale of a sibling love triangle—thus revealing the narrative that Frame projected onto the images.

Read More >>
News: Recent Press: KLEA McKENNA in ART IN AMERICA, December 21, 2018 - Leah Ollman

Recent Press: KLEA McKENNA in ART IN AMERICA

December 21, 2018 - Leah Ollman

Look and Feel: The Best Photography Books of 2018

Generation by Klea McKenna

What matters to Klea McKenna registers immediately when you take her book, Generation, into your hands. For her, touch is on a par with vision. Surface and image are inextricable. McKenna works in the dark, embossing light-sensitized paper through pressured contact with objects, then exposing the textured sheets to the raking beam of a flashlight. In the past, she has made such “photographic rubbings” using the cross-sections of trees; in Generation, she uses different types of handmade fabrics, from a fringed Spanish shawl to an embroidered Pakistani dress. Some of these photograms are included in the book, along with a text in which McKenna reflects on the material history and intimate use of the textiles. Also included are montages of reference photographs, old and new, ethnographic, cinematic, and vernacular. Like the fabrics, like skin, the book’s cover has a distinct life—the cover of my copy will not look or feel like the cover of yours, since a unique one has been created from the residue of the making of the work for each edition in the limited print run. In case we needed the prompt, the inside back cover is stamped with the directive: FEEL ME.

News: Recent Press, October 27, 2018

Recent Press

October 27, 2018

KLEA McKENNA reviewed in PHOTOGRAPH

By Michael Wilson

If the photogram is ordinarily associated with a shadowy ephemerality, San Francisco artist Klea McKenna’s approach to the form invests it with a physical heft more often linked to printmaking, or even sculpture...In her Generation series, McKenna redirects her lens toward the human realm, depicting textiles transformed by wear and tear into haunting records of women’s experiences – narratives removed from McKenna’s own by the specificities of time and place but united with it in other ways. La China Poblana (1), 2018, for example, embodies a fascinating intersection of cultural identities in its depiction of an old skirt encrusted with sequins. This traditional garment tells the story of a Rajasthani woman who, in the late 1600s, was kidnapped, sold into slavery, and taken to the Mexican city of Puebla, where she eventually married a wealthy merchant.

Read More >>
News: Recent Press, October 10, 2018

Recent Press

October 10, 2018

KLEA McKENNA reviewed in MUSÉE MAGAZINE

by Adam Ethan Berner

The photograms render their subjects in incredibly intimate detail; each stitching shines through the silvery imprint, lines and creases transforming from marks to be fixed into something ethereal and beautiful. Even a seemingly tangled scattering of 48 nylon stockings becomes a beautiful composition of fabric, a twisting and flowing set of silvery smoke that beckons the viewer to imagine what is and what could be...
It reveals the life and labor that took place to create these works in the first place, highlighting the identities of those who had been rendered invisible by the unconscious assumption that objects like these just appear without the labor of actual people...Each crease, each line, each stitching, and each decoration becomes a testament to the lives of those who made these works, like the creation of a soul now passed onto the viewer.

News: Recent Press, October  4, 2018

Recent Press

October 4, 2018

KLEA McKENNA in COLLECTOR DAILY 

By Richard B. Woodward

Over the last 5 years, Klea McKenna has repeatedly proven herself to be a contemporary master of the photogram. A technical innovator who has nonetheless remained true to this primal act of the medium—writing on pieces of paper with light—she has created ravishing prints that incorporate nature into the process of their emanation, an artistic philosophy that reflects an unconventional upbringing in northern California.

link to full article

News: Exhibition at PRATT, October  3, 2018

Exhibition at PRATT

October 3, 2018


ALLEN FRAME: INNAMORATO
curated by LIA GANGITANO

October 3 – December 14

Opening reception Wednesday, October 3, 6–8 pm

PRATT INSTITUTE PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY
ARC Building, Lower Level, Brooklyn, NY 11205

DIRECTIONS: If coming by subway, take the G train to the Clinton-Washington station and use the Washington Avenue exit. Walk up Washington Avenue one block to Dekalb Avenue and take a right one block to Hall Street. Enter the campus at the corner of Dekalb Avenue and Hall Street. Walk through campus to the ARC building at the end. It is a two story building with many triangular roofs.
link to more directions      link to campus map

Pratt Gallery hours: Monday–Friday, 11 AM–5 PM
link to more information

News: Artist Talk, September 14, 2018

Artist Talk

September 14, 2018

California based artists KLEA McKENNA and Aspen Mays in conversation with Joshua Chuang (Senior Curator of Photography, New York Public Library)

PENUMBRA ARTIST SERIES
Friday, September 14th, 7:00 pm

News: Recent Press, September 13, 2018

Recent Press

September 13, 2018

KLEA McKENNA in QUIET LUNCH

By Kurt McVey

Her work, as she sees it, though aesthetically gorgeous, sensual and mysterious, is dependent on the idea that these things, the sinewy, ghostly photograms-a physical and yet metaphysical expression of these textiles-have something to say for themselves. “They’re not just dead matter.”

News: Upcoming Exhibition, September 12, 2018

Upcoming Exhibition

September 12, 2018

KLEA McKENNA: Generation

Gitterman Gallery is proud to present an exhibition of contemporary work by Klea McKenna. The exhibition opens on Wednesday, September 12th from 6–8 p.m. and continues through Saturday, November 10th.  

This exhibition marks her first solo show in New York and the beginning of her representation by Gitterman Gallery. It is presented in association with Von Lintel Gallery in Los Angeles where McKenna will have a concurrent exhibition from September 7th through October 20th.
 
The exhibition presents McKenna's most recent work Generation alongside work from two of her previous series Automatic Earth and Web Studies. With each series, McKenna uses the photogram process innovatively to create unique gelatin silver prints that contain both vivid detail and ethereal abstraction. She pays homage to her subject's histories while re-animating them through her engagement, revealing nuance, depth and energy.

Read More >>
News: New Representation, July 26, 2018

New Representation

July 26, 2018

We are proud to announce the representation of KLEA McKENNA

News: Recent Press: new publication LIFEGUARD, June 22, 2018

Recent Press: new publication LIFEGUARD

June 22, 2018

JOSEPH SZABO in THE NEW YORKER

Three Decades of Lifeguards at New York’s Jones Beach
By Andrea DenHoed

An avid chronicler of American youth, Szabo began taking pictures at Jones Beach in 1960, and returned year after year to capture the diverse human menagerie that gathers every summer: the evolving styles of swimsuits, the near-naked bodies in their limitless variety, the jubilance and intimacy of a day at the beach. Floating above it all, in Szabo’s scenes, is the figure of the lifeguard, on a high perch, upright and vigilant amid the languid bodies and umbrellas below. Sometimes they are a taken-for-granted part of the landscape, their chairs blending into a wide-angle view of the crowd; sometimes they’re godlike, on a literal pedestal and shot from the ground.

Link to full article

News: Recent Press: new publication LIFEGUARD, June  8, 2018

Recent Press: new publication LIFEGUARD

June 8, 2018

JOSEPH SZABO in THE NEW YORK TIMES

‘Baywatch’ Gets Its Game Face On
By John Leland

Joseph Szabo photographed the lifeguards at Jones Beach for 25 years. He saw things that most of us never will. 

Link to full article

News: Recent Press, May  8, 2018

Recent Press

May 8, 2018

KHALIK ALLAH in COLLECTOR DAILY

By Loring Knoblauch

The durable power in Allah’s portraits lies in his unflinching willingness to connect, to take the risk of engaging with someone who may at first be rightfully fearful or defensive.

Read More >>
News: Museum Exhibition, April 28, 2018

Museum Exhibition

April 28, 2018

PICTURE FICTION:
Kenneth Josephson 
and Contemporary Photography
April 28–December 30, 2018

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, CHICAGO

News: Recent Press, April 26, 2018

Recent Press

April 26, 2018

KHALIK ALLAH in THE NEW YORK TIMES

10 Galleries to Visit Now on the Upper East Side
By MARTHA SCHWENDENER

The Art Deco Fuller Building at 41 East 57th Street has historically been an art gallery hive. One of its tenants is Gitterman, a gallery devoted to photography and now showing the work of Khalik Allah, a young filmmaker and photographer


Read More >>
News: Recent Press, April  3, 2018

Recent Press

April 3, 2018


KHALIK ALLAH in THE FILM STAGE 

New Directors/New Films 2018 Review by Jason Ooi

In just two films, he has developed and honed his incomparable style, providing the festival, and the documentary form itself, with one of the most memorable, intense experiences in recent memory.

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press, March 28, 2018

Recent Press

March 28, 2018


KHALIK ALLAH in THE NEW YORK TIMES

BLACK MOTHER selected as one of
11 Movies You Need to Know at New Directors/New Films by A.O. Scott

Gliding from color to black and white, from digital to analog, from grim realism to spiritual ecstasy, the film offers a song of praise to the island of Jamaica and a reckoning with its painful history and hard-pressed present. Mr. Allah gathers a rich blend of voices, faces and natural wonders, a kaleidoscope in which shards of violence and poverty commingle with glimmers of dignity and resilience.

link to article

Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press, March 26, 2018

Recent Press

March 26, 2018


5 TOP UPPER EAST SIDE ART GALLERIES

NewYorkHotels.com

News: Artists Interview, March 19, 2018

Artists Interview

March 19, 2018


LOIS CONNER
Interviewed by George Slade in B+W MAGAZINE

What initially sends me out into the world is often a story, photograph or painting; some aspect of the world that haunts me because of its absolute unfamiliarity, its beauty or incomprehensible existence. Trying to render a visual encounter through photography is nearly impossible. Bending and twisting what the camera faithfully describes into something of fiction in order to give form and meaning to what exists in front of you. With the confluence of light, circumstance, chance and a dozen other factors I attempt to conjure up a world, one seemingly half-imagined and breathing with the life of histories.

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press, January 29, 2018

Recent Press

January 29, 2018

KHALIK ALLAH in HUCK

Dark, soulful portraits of Harlem at night
Psychic x-rays

By MISS ROSEN

Khalik Allah takes to the streets of New York City, capturing the nocturnal locals of Harlem in a series of bold and beautiful images.

In the summer of 1998, Khalik Allah had come to a major crossroad after failing eighth grade. Dancing with a B-boy crew had been keeping him out late at night, and school had failed to interest him. Yet he understood the importance of educating himself. Concerned about his future, he headed up to Harlem and began to study with the Five-Percent Nation at the Allah School.

FULL ARTICLE

News: Recent Press, January 27, 2018

Recent Press

January 27, 2018

Fireflies: Fax Machine Images
On WILLIAM LARSON by CHARLES H. TRAUB

DEAR DAVE 26

After 40 years, I’m still in awe of William Larson’s Firefly images. I first encountered them in 1977 when I began working on a chronicle of photography at the Institute of Design (ID) in Chicago, The New Vision: Forty Years of Photography. Larson’s faxed images became a quintessential and exemplary art of my traveling exhibition that originated at the Light Gallery in 1979 and in the subsequent book, published by Aperture in 1982. How time flies!

Fireflies in themselves are light in motion. Catching them is about timing (a quick hand) and image making is about all three—time, light and motion. In a single transmission, William Larson caught something new about this relationship that hadn’t been seen before in six-minute transmissions of collaged and montaged images using a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter in 1969. He sent his imagination flying into a new world of transmission.

Read More >>
News: Recent Press, January 18, 2018

Recent Press

January 18, 2018


KHALIK ALLAH in THE NEW YORKER

A Filmmaker and Photographer’s Urgent, Personal Portraits of Harlem at Night
by Richard Brody

These images—of people, mainly black people, many of whom endure drug addiction, physical infirmities, poverty, homelessness, and harassment from the police—have an essential documentary urgency. They also have a spiritual essence, an element of passion and grace that’s revealed by Allah’s compositional grandeur and textural intimacy—but these revelations of style arise from his own experience, which he also details in the book, in an extraordinary personal essay, “Camera Ministry.” In the essay, Allah—who has an exhibition opening at New York’s Gitterman Gallery, in March—discusses his first enthusiasm for filmmaking, in the late nineteen-nineties, as a teen-ager from Long Island, at the same time that he began to frequent Harlem, to study the work of the Five Percent Nation, and to become friends with members of the Wu-Tang Clan. He discusses the happenstance of his sudden interest in photography at a time, in his early twenties, when he had put his filmmaking on hold. It’s a story that involves his family, but, above all, it involves his relationships with the people whom he photographs, as well as with other people whom he encountered on the street.

full article

News: Recent Press, November 28, 2017

Recent Press

November 28, 2017


KHALIK ALLAH in THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

By LUC SANTE

The result is a panorama of human emotion: sadness, passion, bewilderment, pride, suspicion, amusement, exhaustion — all the faces of the night. “Time is over, and the world has ended,” Allah writes. “Only the Light continues.”

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press, October 25, 2017

Recent Press

October 25, 2017


JAMES HERBERT by Loring Knoblauch

COLLECTOR DAILY

News: Recent Press, September 15, 2017

Recent Press

September 15, 2017


JAMES HERBERT 

Gitterman Gallery, in New York, is currently the host of one of the most beautiful exhibition of the new season.

L'OEIL DE LA PHOTOGRAPHIE

News: Recent Press, September  6, 2017

Recent Press

September 6, 2017

JAMES HERBERT interview with Sarah Moroz

"I’m interested in a sort of tenderness, and even sadness," says the artist of his evocative black-and-white images.

"Desire is when you see something you like; it looks good to you. That can be a peach, or it can be a person. When artists deny that they're interested in beauty, because they have a conceptual conceit that overrides it… I'm interested in a sort of tenderness, and even sadness, in eroticism."

"Process is very meaningful to me because I don't see any other way to discover anything, except by going on the journey. I would never take a tour — I want to wander around with a backpack."

i-D VICE

News: Artist News, April 21, 2017

Artist News

April 21, 2017


ALLEN FRAME
is a recipient of the 2017-2018 ROME PRIZE
a fellowship awarded by the AMERICAN ACADEMY IN ROME

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press, December  7, 2016 - “Hommage à Christian Bouqueret”

Recent Press

December 7, 2016 - “Hommage à Christian Bouqueret”


GITTERMAN GALLERY included in TRAVELMAG's Best Galleries on the Upper East Side.

Gitterman’s well-curated photographic exhibits capture realism as much as they obscure it. The thought-provoking show “Hommage à Christian Bouqueret” was a collection of the late historian, curator and collector’s vintage photographs. One particular highlight was an untitled gelatin silver print by Roger Parry that depicted, with vivid color, the dejected beauty of a young woman. Another by François Kollar superimposed images to show how two souls can occupy one body. This sense of warring duality permeated the entire exhibit. 

Read more:

L'Oeil de la Photographie

Musée Magazine

BW Gallerist

Artwell Guide 

News: Recent Press, October 31, 2016

Recent Press

October 31, 2016


HENRY HOLMES SMITH exhbition revieved in THE NEW YORKER by Vince Aletti.

The little-known American photographer worked closely with László Moholy-Nagy in Chicago, in the nineteen-thirties, and was similarly drawn to the medium’s experimental fringes. 

Read More >> Download Article (PDF)
News: Recent Press, September 20, 2016

Recent Press

September 20, 2016


HENRY HOLMES SMITH exhbition revieved in COLLECTOR DAILY by Richard B. Woodward.

This sample of 29 prints is therefore welcome and timely. The experimental spirit that he encouraged in his writings is more in synch with the zeitgeist than perhaps at any time since the late ‘60s-early ‘70s. Mariah Robertson and Matthew Brandt are only two of the many younger artists whose color pictures wouldn’t look out of place next to his.

Read More >>